6 Must-See Places in Hue (Central Vietnam)

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Khai Dinh's Tomb: located on the slopes of the steep Chau Chu Mountain. (Hue, Central Vietnam)
Khai Dinh’s Tomb: located on the slopes of the steep Chau Chu Mountain. (Hue, Central Vietnam)

Situated at the geographic mid-point of Vietnam is the historical and mesmerizing city of Hue. Established as the imperial capital of Vietnam in 1802 under the Nguyễn Dynasty, it remained the country’s political, cultural and religious hub for nine dynasties until 1945. Such is its historical importance; Hue’s imperial citadel, royal tombs and temples are collectively inscribed into UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites.

For the potential visitor, we’ve taken the guesswork out of your planning by visiting Hue in Apr-2016 and coming up with the following list of Top 6 Must-See Places in Hue! Enjoy!

 

See also:

 

#1: Hue Citadel (Imperial City)

Ngo Mon Gate of Hue Imperial City. Vietnam.
Ngo Mon Gate of Hue Imperial City. Vietnam.

The most historically significant attraction in Hue is undoubtedly the Citadel, which bound the Imperial City of the Nguyễn Dynasties. Within the Imperial City is the Purple Forbidden City, which houses the residence and administrative court of the Nguyễn Emperors. (Click here to see the layout of the complex)

The To Mieu (The Mieu Temple). Honoring the Nyugen Dynasty Emperors. Hue Imperial City, Vietnam.
The To Mieu (The Mieu Temple). Honoring the Nyugen Dynasty Emperors. Hue Imperial City, Vietnam.

The construction of the Citadel started in 1804, after Emperor Gia Long (first Emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty) took control of unified Vietnam. It is protected by fortified embankments and ringed by a moat.

Sadly, much of the original construction in the Citadel had been destroyed during the Vietnam War; only a handful survived. Restoration projects had been started. Nevertheless, there is still enough architecture in its current form to give visitors a taste of Vietnam during its feudal era.

(Tourist Map of Hue Imperial City)

(see Hue Citadel images in higher resolution) 


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#2: Thiên Mụ Pagoda

Thiên Mụ Pagoda. Hue, Central Vietnam.
Thiên Mụ Pagoda. Hue, Central Vietnam.

Built in 1601, the seven stories Thien Mu Pagoda is the tallest religious building in Vietnam. It is located a short drive away from the Citadel. Perched on top of a small hill beside the Perfume River, the historic temple offers a good view of the river and the surrounding rural landscape.

Legend has it that a Nguyễn Lord was touring the area when he heard about the story of an old lady, known as Thiên Mụ (literally “celestial lady”). The old lady prophesied that a lord would one day build a pagoda on the hill to pray for the nation’s prosperity. Strangely, the old lady disappeared soon after. After hearing the story, the Nguyễn Lord ordered the construction of the pagoda.

(see Thiên Mụ Pagoda images in higher resolution) 

 

#3: Imperial Tomb of Emperor Minh Mang

Minh Mang's Tomb. Widely recognized as the most grandiose of all Nguyễn era royal tombs. (Hue, Central Vietnam)
Minh Mang’s Tomb. Widely recognised as the most grandiose of all Nguyễn era royal tombs. (Hue, Central Vietnam)

Minh Mang (1791–1841) was the second emperor of the Nguyễn dynasty and the son of Emperor Gia Long. He reigned from 1820 until his death in 1841, and was widely held in high-regard for his devotion to running the country.

Imperial Tomb of Emperor Minh Mang. Hue, Central Vietnam.
Imperial Tomb of Emperor Minh Mang. Hue, Central Vietnam.

Minh Mang’s tomb is located on the west bank of Perfume River, approximately 13km from Hue Citadel. He started planning for the tomb in 1840, but passed on shortly after. His son and successor, Thieu Tri, continued the construction and completed it in 1843.

Widely recognised as the most grandiose of all Nguyễn era royal tombs, it consists of 40 monuments. Most interestingly, all monuments in the tomb are symmetric about an axis running the length of the tomb.

(see Minh Mang Tomb’s images in higher resolution) 

 

#4: Imperial Tomb of Emperor Khai Dinh

Khai Dinh's Tomb. Khai Dinh (1885-1925) was the 12th emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty. (Hue, Central Vietnam)
Khai Dinh’s Tomb. Khai Dinh (1885-1925) was the 12th emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty. (Hue, Central Vietnam)

Khai Dinh (1885-1925) was the 12th emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty, reigning from 1916 till his passing on in 1925. Approximately 10km from Hue Citadel, the tomb is located on the slopes of the steep Chau Chu Mountain.

Taking 11 years to complete (1920-1931), the lavish tomb was funded via a tax increase on the population. This fueled further resentment against Khai Dinh, whom was already suffering from widespread disapproval.

Though small, Khai Dinh’s tomb is more sophisticated than other Nguyễn era royal tombs. It employs a good mix of Eastern and Western architecture styles. The largest dragon stone sculpture in Vietnam can be found here.

(see Khai Dinh Tomb’s images in higher resolution) 

 

#5: Imperial Tomb of Emperor Tu Duc

Tu Duc Tomb (Hue, Central Vietnam). Tu Duc (1829–1883) was the 4th emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty, reigning from 1847–1883.
Tu Duc Tomb (Hue, Central Vietnam). Tu Duc (1829–1883) was the 4th emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty, reigning from 1847–1883.

Tu Duc (1829–1883) was the 4th emperor of the Nguyễn Dynasty, reigning from 1847–1883. Widely regarded as the last emperor of Vietnam, he was the last to rule Vietnam independently before parts of it became a French colony.

Renowned for its scale and splendor, Tu Duc planned and constructed the tomb complex from 1864-1867, long before his passing. The exorbitant cost of the tomb was funded via increasing tax, which subsequently led to an unsuccessful rebellion in 1866. The complex remains one of the most scenic of Nguyễn Dynasty’s palaces and tombs.

For a tomb complex, Tu Duc’s tomb contains an unusual myriad of living amenities. In fact, Tu Duc used the tomb palace as his residence and stayed there (with his many wives/concubines) for a significant period.

Oddly, despite its magnificence and scale, Tu Duc was eventually buried in a different and secret location in Hue, probably to deter grave robbers. The 200 servants whom buried him were subsequently beheaded to prevent any leak, and the real tomb remained unknown till date.

(see Tu Duc Tomb’s images in higher resolution) 

 

#6: Hue Walking Street (Night Market)

Engrossed artist at Hue Walking Street (Night Market). Hue, Central Vietnam.
Engrossed artist at Hue Walking Street (Night Market). Hue, Central Vietnam.

Started in Jan-2012, the 400m long Hue Walking Street is located on the southern banks of the Perfume River (opposite Hue Citadel and along Nguyen Dinh Chieu street). Open daily from 5-11pm; the pedestrian-only street has more than 100 stalls dealing in traditional crafts products and consumer goods. There is also a 120m long dining area by the river that serves traditional Hue cuisines. Definitely one of the better places to hang out during the evenings. (website link)

(see Hue Walking Street images in higher resolution) 

 

Travel tips for Hue

Hue Tourist Map showing the key tourist attractions. Vietnam.
Hue Tourist Map showing the key tourist attractions. Vietnam.
Where to stay:
  • Hue is a relatively small city, with the Hue Citadel located on the northern banks of the city’s main river (Perfume River). Two bridges link the Citadel to the southern bank where the modern Hue city is.
  • The immediate area (on the southern bank) surrounding the two bridges has a high density of affordable and good accommodation options, complete with numerous restaurants, pubs and travel agencies. Clearly a good location to be based while in Hue. The biggest supermarket in Hue (Big-C) is a mere 15 minutes walk away.

 

Most convenient way to visit the attractions:
  • As with many smaller cities in Vietnam, public transport option in Hue is limited. The easiest way to access the major attractions within the city is via motorbike (self-ride) or thru a tour (via travel agent).
  • Motorbike (self-ride):
    • Numerous motorbike-renting establishments can be found in the city; most travel agents and hotels have link to such services.
    • By law, a local license is required when riding in Vietnam. In reality, a fair number of foreign tourists flout this rule. Fueled by the fact that the rule is seldom enforced, especially in smaller cities.
    • However, caution is recommend. Problems can arise when accidents occur as the rider is without license and insurance cover.
  • Travel agents:
    • A safer and more convenient (albeit higher cost) way is to book a tour package with one of the many travel agents in the city. Nature of tour varies greatly; driver only or with English-speaking tour guide, vehicle type, and number of attractions included in tour etc.
    • Note that tours typically DO NOT include the cost of entry fees, as these can be substantial. (See below for more info)
    • Example: For our Apr-2016 trip, we paid a total of 600,000D for 3 pax (200,000D x3) full day tour. Includes 5 attractions, driver only (no guide) in a good condition Toyota Vios. Entry fees not included.
  • Entry fee discounts:
    • Entry fee is required for the Imperial City and all of the imperial tombs. Combo tickets (which offer good discounts) can be purchased at any of these sites. Approach the ticket counter at any of the sites for more info.

 

 

2016 Vietnam VLOG (Hue, Hoi An, Da Nang)

Below is the VLOG on our Apr-2016 Central Vietnam adventure.

 

 

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